The Journeyman: Max Maverick Part 2 0

Continuing our interview with Max Maverick. (If you missed Part 1, you can read it here: http://www.mightygeek.com/sports/journeyman-max-maverick/) Max the referee. MG: Now, I’ve seen you ref up to as many as four or five matches during a single show. Is this a common occurrence and how difficult is it to go out this many times in one night?

MM: I frequently ref entire shows by myself. It’s not too bad doing them by myself. I did one where I got zero breaks after intermission, had no clue what was happening in the main, and just rolled with it after getting bumped in the semi. It’s easier with another ref and more relaxed, though I do have a tendency to get bored.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fh2A-qhUp14

MG: Describe for us, if you would, the role of the referee in the wrestling match.

MM: The referee is the law in the ring. What he says goes. A good referee can make or break a match. The referee is a communicator in the match. He can relay messages back and forth and even help pace the match. A good referee can also call spots for the guys in the ring when they get lost, especially if it’s a couple of green guys in the ring.

MG: The referee then, is very crucial in how the match goes. it’s something I’ve wondered about for some time and that I don’t think most fans consider. Are there any particular experiences in this you’d like to relate?

MM: Not so much on the calling spots, but one match that I got chewed out about, the veteran had the other guy in a Boston Crab, and the guy taking the move was selling his ass off. I’m down there checking on him asking if he gives. After the match, the vet chews my ass telling me I need to be going back and forth between the two because he needed me to tell him to work to the ropes. I didn’t and it bogged the match down and killed some of the heat.

MG: Most fans should be familiar with the Boston Crab/rope spot and have an idea of what you’re saying here. What’s life for the Maverick One outside the ring like? How do you fill your days?

MG: Life outside the ring is pretty good. I’ve got an awesome wife who does the best video in the area. I’ve got two boys that rock. They’re my future wrestlers.

When I’m not working, I’m usually with my family. I play xbox with my boys, wrestle with them, my oldest can take a good lick.

My wife and I enjoy relaxing, doing nothing. We’re kinda geeky. Been watching old Babylon 5 episodes, and we’re big fans of Big Bang Theory.

MG: What about music?

MM: I listen to a lot of stuff, from rock to country to a bit of rap. I loathe hip hop though. I’m real big on Blink-182, Weezer, and Tom Petty. Those are my top 3.

MG: What about film or plays? Any time for a former theatre student to take in any of these?

MM: I’ve done a couple few. My first one was One Flew Over the Cookoo’s Nest. I played Cheswick. I played a small role in a production of As You Like It. I did a bunch of scene work, but I found myself more drawn to the technical and production side.

I did a lot on the tech side when I first broke in the biz. I did sound for a while there before I started ring announcing.

MG: So you announce, too?

MM: It’s been a couple of years since I last did it, but it’s again something I enjoyed and was good at. I got booked to do the ring announcing at a show in west Texas in front of 4000 people. i’d still be up for putting the suit on and doing it again, but apparently more people need a ref.

MG: No doubt, but as a trained theatre major you obviously have the voice chops for the announcing gig.

MM: I do pretty well. Actually had Ron Simmons give me props for it. Between doing theatre, radio, and ring announcing, I’ve developed a nice set of skills.

MG: You’re definitely set to be a utility player in the industry.
You learn camera work and video editing and you’re a one man promotion.

MM: I actually do a bit of video editing with the video my wife shoots. So between me and her, we’ve got it covered. I’ve done security, sound, announcing, refing, wrestling, managed, and booked. About all I haven’t done in the biz is promote.

MG: Well hell, get to it, man! lol

MM: I’ve got ideas for later on down the road, at least promote one hell of a show
Promoting is more headache than I’m ready to deal with. The managing stint wasn’t actually anything fancy. I did it once, just coming to the ring. It’s a hell of a lot harder than anything else, mentally at least. It’s hard to figure out what to do without taking away from the match or just standing like an idiot.

I booked the last SWA show and it was atrocious. I had no payroll to speak of and it was going to be a trainwreck either way. I had some good guys there that came to help me out. It wouldn’t have been so bad, but I had to appease the promoter and his running buddy. I like them personally, but professionally, they’re turrible. So I was booking within such tight constraints, and still had to fight to put together matches that would be decent. My ego only went as far as making sure I had a good match, which I succeeded in with Roosevelt.

I helped book a couple others here and there, but that was my big one and was a hell of a headache.

MG: Did they actually expect you to be able to put together a decent show without a payroll, or did they just not care at that point?

MM: I don’t think they cared. The promoter got his jollies by being around the show. That show actually had about 150 people, all papered, and then he decided to quit after that bitching about not making any money. If you paper one show and don’t do another, you’ve wasted your time and money. While most of the card was mediocre, I feel between my match, the main event, and the three way we had for the Open Weight belt, we could have kept at least half the crowd for the next one.

MG: So after all of that, Any desire to manage again? Perhaps be a mouthpiece for a wrestler lacking in promo skils?

MM: I’m of the mindset I’ll do whatever I get paid for, and if someone came to me wanting me to manage, i’d say yes.

MG: I think wrestling needs more managers right now. just my opinion.

MM: Yeah, managing is becoming a lost art. The Blue Puma could use a mouthpiece as he doesn’t talk.

Watch for the third and final installment of the Max Maverick interview!